Dtd validating parser

02-Apr-2014 14:36

For example, both the Tobin and STG parsers can optionally be made namespace-aware if your application requires it.You may find that you prefer one tool's error reporting format to another's. By the way, in theory you need to submit a given document to only one parser to ensure its "correctness." After all, the XML Recommendation is what it is, right?Validating parsers also can use information from the DTD to provide extra capabilities, such as entity substitution and attribute defaulting.(Note: Any parser that validates will also check for well-formedness.

In the following illustration, Stylus Studio®'s real-time syntax checking has reported an error with the element — this element is not defined in its respective Document Type Definition, so it is highlighted in orange during editing, and it is reported in the output window at the time the XML is validated.

Back in 1998, within a few months of the XML 1.0 Recommendation's release, one observer reported on XML-DEV that he'd found over 200 parsers (after hitting 200, he gave up counting).

Stylus Studio® 5.1 fully supports XML document validation based on DTD (in addition to full support for W3C XML Schema) to ensure compatibility with legacy XML systems. To associate any open XML file with an externally defined DTD, click XML Associate XML with Schema from the Stylus Studio® menu. Validating an XML document against its associated DTD is easy — simply click the Validate Document button (the tree diagram with the green checkmark) in Stylus Studio®'s XML Editor, then select the DTD validating parser you want to use.

A parser which is nominally non-validating may or may not make use of a DTD if one is present.) For this sort of application, I generally use one or more of the various Web-based syntax checkers.

(Here, I'll call these "parsers" even though they're actually Web-based interfaces which sit on top of parsers.) Good ones are: Aside from the well-formedness-vs.-validity and user-interface differences, these syntax-checkers differ in smaller ways.

In the following illustration, Stylus Studio®'s real-time syntax checking has reported an error with the element — this element is not defined in its respective Document Type Definition, so it is highlighted in orange during editing, and it is reported in the output window at the time the XML is validated.Back in 1998, within a few months of the XML 1.0 Recommendation's release, one observer reported on XML-DEV that he'd found over 200 parsers (after hitting 200, he gave up counting).Stylus Studio® 5.1 fully supports XML document validation based on DTD (in addition to full support for W3C XML Schema) to ensure compatibility with legacy XML systems. To associate any open XML file with an externally defined DTD, click XML Associate XML with Schema from the Stylus Studio® menu. Validating an XML document against its associated DTD is easy — simply click the Validate Document button (the tree diagram with the green checkmark) in Stylus Studio®'s XML Editor, then select the DTD validating parser you want to use.A parser which is nominally non-validating may or may not make use of a DTD if one is present.) For this sort of application, I generally use one or more of the various Web-based syntax checkers.(Here, I'll call these "parsers" even though they're actually Web-based interfaces which sit on top of parsers.) Good ones are: Aside from the well-formedness-vs.-validity and user-interface differences, these syntax-checkers differ in smaller ways.Let's start with one of the most basic facts about using parsers: Unless you happen to be developing XML-processing software, you can pretty much forget about this question. But it's not really a question to concern yourself with if you're just interested in browsing XML, editing it, or creating style sheets.