Awadating ru

25-Mar-2016 11:35

Whilst the East Coast Ngati-Awa call the West Coast branch Koro-Ati-Awa, the latter equally apply that term to the former branch.There is perhaps some justification for this name as applied to some at least of the Whakatane Ngati-Awa.Another authority says that Awa-nui-a-rangi flourished long before Manaia came here in the "Toko-maru," and that his name in full is Awa-heke-iho-i-te-rangi, and that he was a son of the god Tamarau-te-heketanga-rangi, his mother being Rongo-ueroa whose other and earthly husband was Ruarangi, by whom she had Rauru.

awadating ru-43

The last on the list is the celebrated Ihaia, who caused Katatore to bo shot (9th July, 1858), and which act led to the war amongst the tribes at Waitara, etc., at that time.The Tarauaki tribe held that the Ati-Awa boundary was at Whaka-ngerengere where they marched with Ngati-Rua-nui.and that the mountain of Ati-Awa, in place of being Mount Egmont, was Whaka-ahu-rangi, a place on the old inland road from Matai-tawa to Hawera, near where Stratford is situated—for the origin of which name see infra.If the story is true, then these people were probably some of the tangata-whenua Ati-Awa.Old Tamahau was well versed in Maori history, and would not confuse this Taranaki canoe with "Nuku-tere" the canoe of Whiro-nui, which came to New Zealand from Hawaiki apparently two or three generations before the heke of 1350, and whose crew settled on the coast near Te Kaha, Bay of Plenty.

The last on the list is the celebrated Ihaia, who caused Katatore to bo shot (9th July, 1858), and which act led to the war amongst the tribes at Waitara, etc., at that time.The Tarauaki tribe held that the Ati-Awa boundary was at Whaka-ngerengere where they marched with Ngati-Rua-nui.and that the mountain of Ati-Awa, in place of being Mount Egmont, was Whaka-ahu-rangi, a place on the old inland road from Matai-tawa to Hawera, near where Stratford is situated—for the origin of which name see infra.If the story is true, then these people were probably some of the tangata-whenua Ati-Awa.Old Tamahau was well versed in Maori history, and would not confuse this Taranaki canoe with "Nuku-tere" the canoe of Whiro-nui, which came to New Zealand from Hawaiki apparently two or three generations before the heke of 1350, and whose crew settled on the coast near Te Kaha, Bay of Plenty. So when these ancient enemies met at Puke-ariki there was a considerable display of feeling, and much 'tall talk,' dancing of war-dances, etc.